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Tuesday, 21 August 2012

Coriander Seeds

What is Coriander Seeds

Coriander is considered both an herb and a spice since both its leaves and its seeds are used as a seasoning condiment. Fresh coriander leaves are more commonly known as cilantro and bear a strong resemblance to Italian flat leaf parsley. This is not surprising owing to the fact that they belong to the same plant family (Umbelliferae).

The fruit of the coriander plant contains two seeds which, when dried, are the parts that are used as the dried spice. When ripe, the seeds are yellowish-brown in color with longitudinal ridges. They have a fragrant flavor that is reminiscent of both citrus peel and sage. Coriander seeds are available in whole or ground powder form.

The name coriander is derived from the Greek word koris, which means bug. It may have earned this name because of the "buggy" offensive smell that it has when unripe. 
Health Benefits
  • As in other spices, coriander is also rich in of dietary fiber. 100 g seeds provide 41.9 g of fiber. Much of this fiber is metabolically inert insoluble fiber, which helps increase bulk of the food by absorbing water throughout the digestive system and help easing constipation condition. 
  • The seeds are excellent source of minerals like iron, copper, calcium, potassium, manganese, zincand magnesium Unlike other dry spice seeds that are lack in vitamin C, coriander seeds contain ample amount of this anti-oxidant vitamin. 100 g of dry seeds provide 21 mg or 35% of RDI of this vitamin. Furthermore, the seeds indeed are storehouse for many vital B-complex vitamins like thiamin, riboflavin, and niacin.
  • Control of Blood Sugar, Cholesterol and Free Radical Production 
  • A Phytonutrient-Dense Herb 
  • Coriander (also called cilantro) contains an antibacterial compound that may prove to be a safe, natural means of fighting Salmonella, a frequent and sometimes deadly cause of food borne illness, suggests a study published in the June 2004 issue of the Journal of Agriculture and Food Chemistry.

Medical disclaimer:

The information and reference in this blog are solely for the general information for the reader. It is not to be used to diagnose health problems or for treatment purposes. It is not a substitute for medical care provided by a licensed and qualified health professional. Please consult your health care provider for any advice on medications.

Names In Other Languages for Coriander Seeds(Arabic, Assamese, Bengali,Chinese, French, German, Gujarati,Hindi, Kannada, Malay, Malayalam, Oriya, Sinhala, Spanish, Tamil, Telugu, Turkish, Urdu)::


Nutritional value

NUTRITION INFORMATION
Amounts per 1 tbsp (5g)

Calorie Information
Amounts Per Selected Serving
%DV
Calories
14.9
(62.4 kJ)
1%
  From Carbohydrate
5.4
(22.6 kJ)
  From Fat
7.4
(31.0 kJ)
  From Protein
2.1
(8.8 kJ)
  From Alcohol
~
(0.0 kJ)

Carbohydrates
Amounts Per Selected Serving
%DV
Total Carbohydrate
2.7
g
1%
Dietary Fiber
2.1
g
8%
Starch
~
Sugars
~

Fats & Fatty Acids
Amounts Per Selected Serving
%DV
Total Fat
0.9
g
1%
Saturated Fat
0.0
g
0%
Monounsaturated Fat
0.7
g
Polyunsaturated Fat
0.1
g
Total trans fatty acids
~
Total trans-monoenoic fatty acids
~
Total trans-polyenoic fatty acids
~
Total Omega-3 fatty acids
~
Total Omega-6 fatty acids
87.5
mg
Protein & Amino Acids
Amounts Per Selected Serving
%DV
Protein
0.6
g
1%

Vitamins
Amounts Per Selected Serving
%DV
Vitamin A
0.0
IU
0%
Vitamin C
1.1
mg
2%
Vitamin D
~
~
Vitamin E (Alpha Tocopherol)
~
~
Vitamin K
~
~
Thiamin
0.0
mg
1%
Riboflavin
0.0
mg
1%
Niacin
0.1
mg
1%
Vitamin B6
~
~
Folate
0.0
mcg
0%
Vitamin B12
0.0
mcg
0%
Pantothenic Acid
~
~
Choline
~
Betaine
~

Minerals
Amounts Per Selected Serving
%DV
Calcium
35.4
mg
4%
Iron
0.8
mg
5%
Magnesium
16.5
mg
4%
Phosphorus
20.5
mg
2%
Potassium
63.3
mg
2%
Sodium
1.8
mg
0%
Zinc
0.2
mg
2%
Copper
0.0
mg
2%
Manganese
0.1
mg
5%
Selenium
1.3
mcg
2%
Fluoride
~

Sterols
Amounts Per Selected Serving
%DV
Cholesterol
0.0
mg
0%
Phytosterols
2.3
mg

Other
Amounts Per Selected Serving
%DV
Alcohol
0.0
g
Water
0.4
g
Ash
0.3
g
Caffeine
~
Theobromine
~


Footnotes for Spices, coriander seed
Source: Nutrient data for this listing was provided by USDA SR-21. Each "~" indicates a missing or incomplete value.

Percent Daily Values (%DV) are for adults or children aged 4 or older, and are based on a 2,000 calorie reference diet. Your daily values may be higher or lower based on your individual needs.

Nutrition Data's Opinion, Completeness Score™, Fullness Factor™, Rating, Estimated Glycemic Load (eGL), and Better Choices Substitutions™ are editorial opinions of NutritionData.com, given without warranty, and are not intended to replace the advice of a nutritionist or health-care professional. Nutrition Data's opinions and ratings are based on weighted averages of the nutrient densities of those nutrients for which the FDA has established Daily Values, and do not consider other nutrients that may be important to your health or take into account your individual needs. Consequently, Nutrition Data's higher-rated foods may not necessarily be healthier for you than lower-rated ones. All foods, regardless of their rating, have the potential to play an important role in your diet.

IF Rating™ is a trademark of Monica Reinagel. Data for the IF Rating was provided by inflammationfactor.com.


Read More http://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/spices-and-herbs/183/2#ixzz21vfZzaSz


Coriander Seeds Substitute

Nothing will be giving same taste as coriander seeds but Coriander seeds and you don't have them, substitute 1 tsp coriander seed with:
  • 1 tsp caraway seeds
  • 1 tsp fennel seeds
  • 1 tsp cumin seeds

Where it can be used
  • Dried coriander seeds are one of the common spice ingredients used worldwide. The whole coriander seeds are used as flavoring agent in confectionary, stews, sausages, sweet breads, and cakes.
  • Along with dill, and fennel, coriander seeds are being used as carminative and digestive agent in various gripe water preparations.
  • The seeds are chewed as a remedy for halitosis (unpleasant breath).
How to Store

Coriander seeds as well as its oil are readily available in the markets year around. The seeds used as spice. Good quality coriander seeds should release pleasant, slightly peppery flavor when squeezed between index and thumb fingers. In the store, buy whole seeds instead of powder since, oftentimes it may contain adulterated spicy powders.
The seeds should be stored in cool, dry, dark place, in airtight containers. This way they keep well for many months

Recipe Using   Coriander Seeds(Here I list only main dishes.. but Coriander Seeds can be used in lot of dishes just to add little flavour)

http://Great-secret-of-life.blogspot.com --> Search for Coriander Seeds 

4 comments:

  1. Wow.. that's loads of information. Thanks for sharing!

    ReplyDelete
  2. very informative dear... i love coriander very much... used to add more in my foods...
    VIRUNTHU UNNA VAANGA

    ReplyDelete
  3. I don't have any words to appreciate this post.....I am really impressed ....the person who created this post surely knew the subject well..Thanks for sharing health benefits of Coriander Seeds.

    ReplyDelete
  4. Awesome blog thank you for sharing us.
    Luthra Dawakhana

    ReplyDelete

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