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Thursday, 6 December 2012

Walnuts

What is Walnut?

The large wrinkled edible seed of a deciduous tree, consisting of two halves contained within a hard shell that is enclosed in a green fruit The tall tree that produces this nut, with compound leaves and valuable ornamental timber that is used chiefly in cabinetmaking and gunstocks. As walnuts age on the tree the outer sheel dries and pulls away, leaving the shell and seed behind. Technically, a walnut is a drupe, not a nut, since it takes the form of a fruit enclosed by a fleshy outer layer which parts to reveal a thin shell with a seed inside. The walnut is not only good for cooking - they are healthy nuts that can also help your heart. However walnuts can pose risks to people with nuts allergies, so use them with caution in cooking. 



Health Benefits

  • They are rich in monounsaturated fatty acids (about 72%) like oleic acid and an excellent source of all important omega-3 essential fatty acids like linoleic acid, alpha-linolenic acid (ALA) and arachidonic acids. Regular intake of walnuts in the diet helps to lower total as well as LDL or “bad cholesterol” and increases HDL or “good cholesterol” levels in the blood. Research studies suggest that Mediterranean diet that is rich in mono-unsaturated fatty acids, and omega-3 fatty acids help to prevent coronary artery disease and strokes by favoring healthy blood lipid profile.
  • Eating just as much as 25 g each day provides about 90% of RDI (recommended daily intake) of omega-3 fatty acids. Research studies have suggested that n-3 fatty acids by their virtue of anti-inflammatory action help to lower the risk of blood pressure, coronary artery disease, strokes and breast, colon and prostate cancers.
  • They are rich source of many phyto-chemical substances that may contribute to their overall anti-oxidant activity, including melatonin, ellagic acid, vitamin E, carotenoids, and poly-phenolic compounds. These compounds have potential health effects against cancer, aging, inflammation, and neurological diseases.
  • Scientists at University of Scranton, Pennsylvania had recently discovered that walnuts have highest levels of popyphenolic antioxidants than any other common edible nuts. 100 g of walnuts contain13541 µmol TE (Trolex equivalents) of oxidant radical absorbance capacity (ORAC). Eating as few as six to seven average size nuts a day could help scavenge disease causing free radicals from the body.
  • In addition, they are an excellent source of vitamin E, especially rich in gamma-tocopherol; contain about 21 g per 100 g (about 140% of daily-required levels). Vitamin E is a powerful lipid soluble antioxidant, required for maintaining the integrity of cell membrane of mucus membranes and skin by protecting it from harmful oxygen-free radicals.
  • These nuts are packed with many important B-complex groups of vitamins such as riboflavin, niacin, thiamin, pantothenic acid, vitamin B-6, and folates.
  • They also very are rich source of minerals like manganese, copper, potassium, calcium, iron,magnesium, zinc, and selenium. Copper is a cofactor for many vital enzymes, including cytochrome c-oxidase and superoxide dismutase (other minerals function as co-factors for this enzyme are manganese and zinc). Zinc is a co-factor in many enzymes that regulate growth and development, sperm generation, digestion and nucleic acid synthesis. Selenium is an important micronutrient, which functions as a co-factor for anti-oxidant enzymes such as glutathione peroxidases.
  • Walnut's oil has flavorful nutty aroma and has excellent astringent properties. Applied locally, it helps to keep skin well protected from dryness. It has also been used in cooking, and as “carrier or base oil” in traditional medicines in massage therapy, aromatherapy, in pharmaceutical and cosmetic industry.
    Medical disclaimer:

    The information and reference guides in this website are intended solely for the general information for the reader. It is not to be used to diagnose health problems or for treatment purposes. It is not a substitute for medical care provided by a licensed and qualified health professional. Please consult your health care provider for any advice on medications.

    Names In Other Languages for Pistachio (Arabic, Assamese, Bengali,Chinese, French, German, Gujarati,Hindi, Kannada, Malay, Malayalam, Oriya, Sinhala, Spanish, Tamil, Telugu, Turkish, Urdu):
    Nutritional value

    NUTRITION INFORMATION
    Amounts per 1 cup, chopped (117g)

    Calorie Information
    Amounts Per Selected Serving
    %DV
    Calories
    765
    (3203 kJ)
    38%
      From Carbohydrate
    64.8
    (271 kJ)
      From Fat
    639
    (2675 kJ)
      From Protein
    61.8
    (259 kJ)
      From Alcohol
    0.0
    (0.0 kJ)

    Carbohydrates
    Amounts Per Selected Serving
    %DV
    Total Carbohydrate
    16.0
    g
    5%
    Dietary Fiber
    7.8
    g
    31%
    Starch
    0.1
    g
    Sugars
    3.1
    g

    Fats & Fatty Acids
    Amounts Per Selected Serving
    %DV
    Total Fat
    76.3
    g
    117%
    Saturated Fat
    7.2
    g
    36%
    Monounsaturated Fat
    10.5
    g
    Polyunsaturated Fat
    55.2
    g
    Total trans fatty acids
    ~
    Total trans-monoenoic fatty acids
    ~
    Total trans-polyenoic fatty acids
    ~
    Total Omega-3 fatty acids
    10623
    mg
    Total Omega-6 fatty acids
    44567
    mg
    Protein & Amino Acids
    Amounts Per Selected Serving
    %DV
    Protein
    17.8
    g
    36%

    Vitamins
    Amounts Per Selected Serving
    %DV
    Vitamin A
    23.4
    IU
    0%
    Vitamin C
    1.5
    mg
    3%
    Vitamin D
    ~
    ~
    Vitamin E (Alpha Tocopherol)
    0.8
    mg
    4%
    Vitamin K
    3.2
    mcg
    4%
    Thiamin
    0.4
    mg
    27%
    Riboflavin
    0.2
    mg
    10%
    Niacin
    1.3
    mg
    7%
    Vitamin B6
    0.6
    mg
    31%
    Folate
    115
    mcg
    29%
    Vitamin B12
    0.0
    mcg
    0%
    Pantothenic Acid
    0.7
    mg
    7%
    Choline
    45.9
    mg
    Betaine
    0.4
    mg

    Minerals
    Amounts Per Selected Serving
    %DV
    Calcium
    115
    mg
    11%
    Iron
    3.4
    mg
    19%
    Magnesium
    185
    mg
    46%
    Phosphorus
    405
    mg
    40%
    Potassium
    516
    mg
    15%
    Sodium
    2.3
    mg
    0%
    Zinc
    3.6
    mg
    24%
    Copper
    1.9
    mg
    93%
    Manganese
    4.0
    mg
    200%
    Selenium
    5.7
    mcg
    8%
    Fluoride
    ~

    Sterols
    Amounts Per Selected Serving
    %DV
    Cholesterol
    0.0
    mg
    0%
    Phytosterols
    84.2
    mg

    Other
    Amounts Per Selected Serving
    %DV
    Alcohol
    0.0
    g
    Water
    4.8
    g
    Ash
    2.1
    g
    Caffeine
    0.0
    mg
    Theobromine
    0.0
    mg


    Footnotes for Nuts, walnuts, english [Includes USDA commodity food A259, A257]
    Source: Nutrient data for this listing was provided by USDA SR-21. Each "~" indicates a missing or incomplete value.

    Percent Daily Values (%DV) are for adults or children aged 4 or older, and are based on a 2,000 calorie reference diet. Your daily values may be higher or lower based on your individual needs.

    Nutrition Data's Opinion, Completeness Score™, Fullness Factor™, Rating, Estimated Glycemic Load (eGL), and Better Choices Substitutions™ are editorial opinions of NutritionData.com, given without warranty, and are not intended to replace the advice of a nutritionist or health-care professional. Nutrition Data's opinions and ratings are based on weighted averages of the nutrient densities of those nutrients for which the FDA has established Daily Values, and do not consider other nutrients that may be important to your health or take into account your individual needs. Consequently, Nutrition Data's higher-rated foods may not necessarily be healthier for you than lower-rated ones. All foods, regardless of their rating, have the potential to play an important role in your diet.

    The Amino Acid Score has not been corrected for digestibility, which could reduce its value.

    IF Rating™ is a trademark of Monica Reinagel. Data for the IF Rating was provided by inflammationfactor.com.


    Read More http://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/nut-and-seed-products/3138/2#ixzz2AblWC0DV


    Walnuts Substitute


    Even though Pecans are closer to Walnut due the texture Almonds can be used as well


    Where it can be used
    It can be eaten raw. But I prefer simple bake or roast. It goes well with salad, baking or simple sweets.

    How to Store

    Store it with the shells. If the nuts are opened then keep it in freezer.. Keeping out from air will make sure walnuts stays longer and fresher


    Recipe Using  Walnut (Here I list only main dishes.. but Walnut can be used in lot of dishes for decoration or just to add little flavour)


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